Don’t Mishandle Me

If food could speak, these three words would probably be their motto. On a daily basis in this country, food is regularly mishandled. When I talk of mishandling food I mean carelessly handling food before eating.

I read about an outbreak of food-borne illness that occurred years ago in Ibadan, Nigeria, that claimed 20 lives. The outbreak resulted from sandwiches that were poorly handled. It was reported that the sandwiches were prepared in Lagos and kept without refrigeration until consumption the next day at Ibadan. When food is mishandled like this, it responds by baring its fangs with disastrous and often fatal consequences.

Mishandling of food occurs in many forms in homes and food businesses:

  • Leaving left-over food unrefrigerated to eat the next day or even several days after.
  • Defrosting frozen food on the kitchen shelf at room temperature.
  • Buying frozen food from the market (or supermarket) and not heading home straight to store in freezer.
  • Inadequate and improper heating of food.
  • Leaving food exposed and uncovered.
  • Preparing food with unwashed hands.
  • Preparing food too far in advance.
  • Using same utensils to prepare raw food and ready to eat food.
  • Keeping or storing ready-to-eat foods like cold sandwiches and salads at room temperature

These are all examples of poor food handling. Many folks do these things inadvertently and unknowingly but this doesn’t spare them the heart ache and ill health that results from it.

At a time when I was handling inflight catering for an airline, we served onboard an egg & mayo sandwich option on the breakfast menu. Nicely packaged in plastic sandwich packs it was a hit with passengers on the early morning domestic flights out of Lagos. But there was a problem; passengers were actually taking the sandwiches off with them when they disembarked at their destination. Why this was a problem was that egg & mayonnaise are highly perishable and high risk food that needs to be held in the chill chain to keep safe to eat and we weren’t sure how passengers were handling the sandwiches after the flight. We were concerned that someone would turn up later on to claim that he got food poisoning from the airline’s sandwich. My boss at that time, Paul Sharp (am certain he will get to read this post soon) decided we had to include a caveat note on the packaging of the sandwich strongly advising passengers that the sandwich be consumed on board during the flight.

Don’t Mishandle Me…that’s a warning that is wise to heed from food & drinks.

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